This Week in Linux 108: Linux Mint 20, openSUSE 15.2, CutiePi Raspberry Pi Tablet, and more!

On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got some big Distro News from Linux Mint, openSUSE and there may be a way to have a Rolling Release of Ubuntu now. We’ve also got some Linux Mobile news thats to the team at XDA Developers making it possible to put Ubuntu Touch from UBports on a lot of Android based devices. We’re going to talk about a new Kickstarter that is going on right now to develop a Raspberry Pi based Tablet called the CutiePi. In App News, were going to talk about a new Task Manager app called Planner and there’s some changes coming to the Matrix Client, Riot.im which is much needed so I am excited for that. We’ve also got some odd news from Microsoft as they have decided to release an Antivirus for Linux called Microsoft Defender ATP. Apple recently announced they are dropping Intel for their own processor platform and we’ll discuss how that will relate to people wanting to run Linux on that hardware. Then we’ll round out the show with some awesome Humble Bundles that are live right now. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

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  1. FWIW, Linux Mint did minor updates through the Update Manager - this is how I upgraded from 19.2 to 19.3. I did watch a video the other night on “manually” upgrading from 19.3 to 20 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4gYY_luRKo&t=306s but I will be waiting for the official method.

  2. When talking about updates on Linux Mint I was referring to major updates only of 19.x to 20.x because every time they’ve made that difficult because of how they structured their distro.

    19.2 to 19.3 is a simple upgrade because both are based on Ubuntu 18.04 so the core doesn’t move on those. Mint’s problem with upgrades is when it goes from core to core. 19.x has 18.04 core and 20.x has 20.04 core.

    Linux Mint used to not be LTS locked so every 6 months the required fresh installs with no upgrades so they realized to stop doing that but since being LTS locked they still have the same exact problem, people just see it less often.

  3. I’ve upgraded major Linux Mint versions to other major versions. There’s a command line tool they use called “mintupgrade”. A couple months back I tested this out because most people recommend doing a clean install for major versions. I went through 17.0 and it’s point releases to 19.3 without problems. Mintupgrade is just a package in the repo you download and run. Of course the package isn’t available until they have the transition working well, which takes time but there’s no huge rush, the 18.04 LTS is still supported until 2023. The Mintupgrade from 19.3 to 20 should be even simpler than previous versions because they don’t have to transition to a different display manager like with 19. It’s 3 lines in the terminal, which is NOT harder than upgrading Ubuntu.

  4. It isn’t harder than upgrading Ubuntu from the command line but doesn’t Ubuntu give you the option to upgrade with a GUI? LTS users don’t get the upgrade notification until the first Piont release (which is around around the Summer), but then they only need to click a button. They don’t have to willingly look for it :slightly_smiling_face:

  5. When you say that the names that Vector chooses need to converge do you think that it could lead to confusion down the line?

    Right now you can tell some one to use the internet and they realize that they can use Firefox or any other number of browsers to reach a website, using the underlying protocols. In a similar way, you can use a number of clients to use the matrix protocol. I feel like keeping the names separate would be a good thing because there are different clients (riot, fractal, ect.) and server implementations (synapse, dendryte, ruma, ect. ). I see where one could come at it from a perspective of lowering the barrier to entry though. Would it be better, as a community, to talk about particular clients then? It doesn’t really matter what home server implementation is being used or the fact that the underlying protocol is called matrix.

    If the projects were called matrix-protocol, matrix-client, matrix-server and matrix-company it seems that it kind of takes away from future projects like the fractal client where everyone else will be playing second fiddle no matter what.

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I am a Podcaster, Writer, Designer and I’ve been a Linux Enthusiast for over 20 years and much of that time I’ve contributed to a wide variety of open source projects. I currently create content for Destination Linux Network including podcasts like Destination Linux, This Week in Linux, Hardware Addicts and other Linux related content.

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